TGleichner

Top 106 books most often marked as “unread”

In sunday salon on April 20, 2008 at 7:36 am

by LibraryThing’s users. 

Bold what you have read, italicize those you started but couldn’t finish, strike-through asterisk for books you have no desire to read, a ? in front for books you never heard of and strike through what you couldn’t stand. Add an asterisk to those you’ve read more than once. Underline those on your to-read list.

Jonathan Strange & M. Norrell
Anna Karenina
Crime and Punishment
Catch-22
One hundred years of solitude
Wuthering Heights
The Silmarillion
Life of Pi
The Name of the Rose
Don Quixote
Moby Dick
Ulysses
Madame Bovary
The Odyssey
Pride and Prejudice
Jane Eyre
A Tale of Two Cities
The Brothers Karamazov
Guns, Germs, and Steel: the fates of human societies
War and Peace
Vanity Fair
The Time Traveller’s Wife
The Iliad
Emma
The Blind Assassin
The Kite Runner
Mrs. Dalloway
Great Expectations
American Gods
A heartbreaking work of staggering genius
Atlas shrugged
Reading Lolita in Tehran

Memoirs of a Geisha
Middlesex
Quicksilver
Wicked : the life and times of the wicked witch of the West
The Canterbury tales
The Historian
A portrait of the artist as a young man
Love in the time of cholera
Brave new world
The Fountainhead
Foucault’s Pendulum
Middlemarch
Frankenstein
The Count of Monte Cristo
Dracula

A clockwork orange
Anansi Boys
The Once and Future King
The Grapes of Wrath
The Poisonwood Bible
1984
Angels & Demons
The Inferno
The Satanic Verses
Sense and sensibility
The Picture of Dorian Gray

Mansfield Park
One flew over the cuckoo’s nest
To the Lighthouse
Tess of the D’Urbervilles
Oliver Twist
Gulliver’s Travels
Les misérables
The Corrections
The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay
The curious incident of the dog in the night-time
Dune
The Prince
The Sound and the Fury
Angela’s Ashes
The God of Small Things
A people’s history of the United States : 1492-present
Cryptonomicon
Neverwhere
A confederacy of dunces
A Short History of Nearly Everything
Dubliners
The unbearable lightness of being
Beloved
Slaughterhouse-five
The Scarlet Letter

Eats, Shoots & Leaves
The mists of Avalon
Oryx and Crake : a novel
Collapse : how societies choose to fail or succeed
Cloud Atlas
The Confusion
Lolita
Persuasion
Northanger Abbey
The Catcher in the Rye
On the Road
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
Freakonomics
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
The Aeneid
Watership Down
Gravity’s Rainbow
The Hobbit
In Cold Blood
White teeth
Treasure Island
David Copperfield
The Three Musketeers

I never want to dismiss any book on a list, that’s why I just bolded the ones that I have read and underlined the ones that I want to read.  Admittedly, there are books on the list that I have never heard of, as a bibliophile I am almost ashamed to admit this, lol!

It has been a good week for the most part.  I have joined in on a few challenges that seem like they will be a lot of fun, have joined another weekly blog group that is about books and anything book related, and we went to the library and I bought two more Lisa Jackson books- after reading Lost Souls I just couldn’t resist.

Now today, it is back to trying to make a list of the books I own and categorize them…this is a HUGE job but hopefully I can make some more progress on this today- any suggestions on how you store your books?  Do you alphebatize them?  And if so, how do you leave room for when new books are added to your stash? 

I also need some advice on how to start rating my books.  I would like to use a 10 point system – this would still result in 5 stars but each point would be worth 1/2 a star.  Can you all enlighten me on some of the things you look for when rating a book?  I want to compile something that is fair to all authors and not just me picking a rating because of my own personal feelings.  Again, all input is greatly appreciated.

Happy Sunday all, and have a great one!

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  1. This was interesting…but I’m not sure the bold worked. I had to do it in word and save to html. We’ll see. Anyway have a great week. I like your blog and I will come back to look at your challenges another time.

    Jonathan Strange & M. Norrell
    Anna Karenina
    Crime and Punishment
    Catch-22
    One hundred years of solitude
    Wuthering Heights
    The Silmarillion
    Life of Pi
    The Name of the Rose
    Don Quixote
    Moby Dick
    Ulysses
    Madame Bovary
    The Odyssey
    Pride and Prejudice
    Jane Eyre
    A Tale of Two Cities
    The Brothers Karamazov
    Guns, Germs, and Steel: the fates of human societies
    War and Peace
    Vanity Fair
    The Time Traveller’s Wife
    The Iliad
    Emma
    The Blind Assassin
    The Kite Runner
    Mrs. Dalloway
    Great Expectations
    American Gods
    ?A heartbreaking work of staggering genius
    Atlas shrugged
    Reading Lolita in Tehran
    Memoirs of a Geisha
    Middlesex
    Quicksilver
    Wicked : the life and times of the wicked witch of the West
    The Canterbury tales
    The Historian
    *A portrait of the artist as a young man
    Love in the time of cholera
    Brave new world
    The Fountainhead
    Foucault’s Pendulum
    Middlemarch
    Frankenstein
    The Count of Monte Cristo
    Dracula
    A clockwork orange
    Anansi Boys
    The Once and Future King
    The Grapes of Wrath
    The Poisonwood Bible
    1984
    Angels & Demons
    The Inferno
    The Satanic Verses
    Sense and sensibility
    The Picture of Dorian Gray
    Mansfield Park
    One flew over the cuckoo’s nest
    To the Lighthouse
    Tess of the D’Urbervilles
    Oliver Twist
    Gulliver’s Travels
    Les misérables
    The Corrections
    ?The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay
    ?The curious incident of the dog in the night-time
    Dune
    The Prince
    The Sound and the Fury
    Angela’s Ashes
    The God of Small Things
    A people’s history of the United States : 1492-present
    Cryptonomicon
    Neverwhere
    A confederacy of dunces
    ?A Short History of Nearly Everything
    Dubliners
    The unbearable lightness of being
    Beloved
    Slaughterhouse-five
    The Scarlet Letter
    Eats, Shoots & Leaves
    The mists of Avalon
    ?Oryx and Crake : a novel
    Collapse : how societies choose to fail or succeed
    Cloud Atlas
    The Confusion
    Lolita
    Persuasion
    Northanger Abbey
    The Catcher in the Rye
    On the Road
    The Hunchback of Notre Dame
    Freakonomics
    ?Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
    The Aeneid
    Watership Down
    ?Gravity’s Rainbow
    The Hobbit
    In Cold Blood
    White teeth
    Treasure Island
    David Copperfield
    The Three Musketeers

  2. Hello, I think I found your blog via ‘my journey through reading’, and couldn’t help but comment. My library is huge and I’m always adding more books, so it’s really necessary that it’s organized… otherwise I’d never find anything! I have about 6 bookshelves and some other ‘areas’, (which are other piles that I consider bookshelves). I organize my books by genre.

    Classics on one shelf, organized by author. Plays and poetry stuck on the end of those, organized by author.
    Historical fiction on another, organized by the setting (ex England/Ireland/America) and then by author.
    Supernatural/Fantasy on another shelf, organized by type (ex vampires, witches, magic), then by author. (well two shelves really-lots of books!)
    Textbooks/Reference on another, organized by type (ex reference-dictionary, thesaurus; Textbook- math, science, literature, languages).
    Movie books on another, (odd to have I know), just books that have been made into movies, not organized in any way.
    Teen books/collections by author (ex I have tons of Nancy Drew stories, old babysitter’s club books, and numerous teen books that I enjoyed so much I couldn’t give them up)
    Lastly, biographies/autobiographies on one shelf not really organized, and then nonfiction on the last shelf, organized by author.

    Wow I am a book geek. Okay, in regards to leaving room for new books. This is difficult to do because if you leave room, it looks like you have holes in your bookshelves. Personally I don’t leave room, which results in me shuffling things around to make room and having to take some books out, in order for it to be organized the way I like it. However, if you have tons of space, (haha which I do not!) put some kind of decorative figure/or bookends on your shelves, and they can be removed gradually as you buy more books.

    The important thing about organizing your books is that you’re able to find what you are looking for without a lot of trouble. One day I up and decided to reorganize my entire collection (the way I have it now) and the next day couldn’t find anything because I wasn’t used to the new system. I stuck with it though and now know where everything is and don’t plan on reorganizing- ever lol.

  3. I like this list too! There are a lot more books that I haven’t read on this one. As far as rating books- it’s so hard isn’t it? If the books are given to you to review then you hate to say anything critical about it…but you want your blog readers to know if it’s really a good book or not. Plus it’s tricky. If you give points for well developed characters, what do you do with a great book that is carried by setting and mood? What about non-fiction? So, to quit pointing out the obvious problems LOL, I will say that what I want to know is the writing good or amateur? Was the plot smooth, even in books that jump from points of view or time line, or did the author jump around at random or add needless crap? Was it original in any way or was it very formulaic? Did the ending fit, even if it left questions it’s ok as long as it made the end compelling, or did it seem rushed, drawn out or thrown together? Was it a good book in your opinion or would you have rather gnawed your own leg off then read another page? It’s your review – I like your taste in books so I am interested in knowing if YOU liked it.

  4. Ooooh, I like this…I think I’ll have to put this one on my blog as well…I see some on there that I didn’t finish (hated them!), but also some I loved….

  5. […] Weblog is a well designed, fun blog to browse. I discovered a meme, of sorts, which lists the top 106 books most marked ‘unread’ on Library Thing. I think I’ll have to do this […]

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